21-Tech

The 21-Tech initiative has allowed me as a Discovery Guide to push myself further on how much information I can process and share with each visitor I encounter.- Odis Garrett, Children’s Museum of Houston Discovery Guide
21-Tech is a bridge between our museum guides and the visitors in that it creates connections between educational concepts and the real world.- Shawn Waxali, Children’s Museum of Houston Discovery Guide
21-Tech has helped Discovery Guides engage visitors by extending their experience through the apps and applying it to the exhibits.- Ian Tibby, Children's Museum of Houston Discovery Guide
21-Tech is a way of ‘hiding the vegetables in the fruit’ where the kids do not realize they are learning, but instead having fun and being fed knowledge that intrigues their minds.- Lauren Bell, Children's Museum of Houston Discovery Guide
21-Tech provides a new outlet for our Discovery Guides to interact with the visitors in a way that further enhances their experience and makes the visit overall extra enjoyable.- Sylvia Garcia, Children's Museum of Houston Discovery Guide

n-Track Tuner

Posted by
/ / Leave a comment

n-Track Tuner will turn your iDevice into a useful instrument for studying sound. The free version has two modes, a Tuner and Diapason (tuning fork). Both are useful on the museum floor when interacting with exhibits about sound.

The Tuner can be

used to tune instruments; we have used it to adjust the amount of water in our musical glasses demonstration. But it also displays a sound graph comparing frequency to volume. On a museum floor, the background noise makes this useful only for measuring sounds which are significantly louder, such as a whistle, clap, or a nearby exhibit. Several options change the display. We have found that using a lower FFT size (Fast Fourier Transformations) is preferred, as the graph is more responsive and has acceptable fidelity for interacting with visitors. The ‘Show Peaks’ option is very helpful when pointing out the graph of a particular sound.

The Diapason simulates a tuning fork, producing clear tones at very specific frequencies. There are multiple ways to adjust the frequency, such as choosing a specific note, using a slider bar, or selecting a specific frequency via a number picker. It will produce tones ranging from 1Hz all the way to 21,999Hz, so this is an excellent way to explore the outer ranges of human hearing. We have also used the app to create specific tones for demonstrations such as Ruben’s Tube and Cornstarch Tentacles.

Museum Recommending: Oregon Museum of Science and Industry
Platform Used: iPad2 (iOS)
Cost: FREE
Link: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/n-track-tuner/id409786458?mt=8

Rich Text AreaToolbarBold (Ctrl + B)Italic (Ctrl + I)Strikethrough (Alt + Shift + D)Unordered list (Alt + Shift + U)Ordered list (Alt + Shift + O)Blockquote (Alt + Shift + Q)Align Left (Alt + Shift + L)Align Center (Alt + Shift + C)Align Right (Alt + Shift + R)Insert/edit link (Alt + Shift + A)Unlink (Alt + Shift + S)Insert More Tag (Alt + Shift + T)Toggle spellchecker (Alt + Shift + N)▼
Toggle fullscreen mode (Alt + Shift + G)Show/Hide Kitchen Sink (Alt + Shift + Z)theme_shortcode.desc
FormatFormat▼
UnderlineAlign Full (Alt + Shift + J)Select text color▼
Paste as Plain TextPaste from WordRemove formattingInsert custom characterOutdentIndentUndo (Ctrl + Z)Redo (Ctrl + Y)Help (Alt + Shift + H)

n-Track Tuner will turn your iDevice into a useful instrument for studying sound. The free version has two modes, a Tuner and Diapason (tuning fork). Both are useful on the museum floor when interacting with exhibits about sound.
The Tuner can be used to tune instruments; we have used it to adjust the amount of water in our musical glasses demonstration. But it also displays a sound graph comparing frequency to volume. On a museum floor, the background noise makes this useful only for measuring sounds which are significantly louder, such as a whistle, clap, or a nearby exhibit. Several options change the display. We have found that using a lower FFT size (Fast Fourier Transformations) is preferred, as the graph is more responsive and has acceptable fidelity for interacting with visitors. The ‘Show Peaks’ option is very helpful when pointing out the graph of a particular sound.
The Diapason simulates a tuning fork, producing clear tones at very specific frequencies. There are multiple ways to adjust the frequency, such as choosing a specific note, using a slider bar, or selecting a specific frequency via a number picker. It will produce tones ranging from 1Hz all the way to 21,999Hz, so this is an excellent way to explore the outer ranges of human hearing. We have also used the app to create specific tones for demonstrations such as Ruben’s Tube and Cornstarch Tentacles.

Museum Recommending: Oregon Museum of Science and Industry
Platform Used: iPad2 (iOS)
Cost: FREE
Link: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/n-track-tuner/id409786458?mt=8

Path:

Leave a comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Project Brief

21-Tech partners study and share the effective use of Personal Mobile Technologies (PMTs) by gallery facilitators in their work with visitors. The initial three years (2011-2013) of 21-Tech are funded in large part by a 21st Century Museum Professionals award from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The project is led by the Children’s Museum of Houston in partnership with Lawrence Hall of Science, New York Hall of Science, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, and Sciencenter. For more information, please visit the About page.

Major funding provided by:

Additional support provided by: